The People's Perspective on Medicine

Can Men Get an Extra Benefit from a Statin?

While doctors argue about how well a statin prevents heart disease in healthy people, researchers have found an unexpected benefit from a statin for men.
Prostate cancer of a human, highly detailed segment of panorama. Photomicrograph as seen under the microscope, 10x zoom.

Statins remain controversial for the primary prevention of heart disease. A review this week in the BMJ concludes that the benefit from a statin is small for low-risk patients (BMJ, Oct. 16, 2019). The scientists were looking specifically at primary prevention–that is, the use of a statin to prevent a heart attack in people who don’t already have heart disease.

Would You Get Benefit from a Statin?

Another analysis in The New England Journal of Medicine, however, states that the benefits outweigh the risks (New England Journal of Medicine, Oct. 17, 2019). The authors point to the importance of “lifestyle management,” utilizing the approaches we endorse at The People’s Pharmacy. These include a healthy weight, a diet low in simple sugars and refined carbs, and time spent in physical activity every day. (Not on the list: eating lots of vegetables, getting enough sleep or regular meditation, although these also contribute to overall health and reduce the risk of heart disease.)

The reviewers recommend that a prescription should be based on a mutual decision between patients and their doctors and the possibility of benefit from a statin. In addition, such a decision must take the patient’s overall likelihood of heart disease into account. Statins can cause serious muscle injury (rhabdomyolysis) or liver damage, although these complications are rare. The authors downplay the risks of diabetes and muscle pain, which have caused trouble for many readers. They also consider other means of lowering cholesterol with the goal of reducing heart disease risk.

A Different Reason to Take a Statin:

A study in Cancer Medicine describes an unexpected new benefit from a statin (Cancer Medicine, Oct.8, 2019). The authors found that men taking statins for at least 11 months were significantly less likely to develop prostate cancer. Men got more protection from cancer with higher Gleason scores, a marker for more advanced pathology.

Men concerned about prostate cancer should welcome this news. It is not the only signal of a prostate benefit from a statin (BJU International, Sep. 3, 2019). In a recent trial, men taking statins along with dutasteride had small but significant drops in prostate size. When men weigh statin benefits against risks, this might help tip the balance.

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About the Author
Terry Graedon, PhD, is a medical anthropologist and co-host of The People’s Pharmacy radio show, co-author of The People’s Pharmacy syndicated newspaper columns and numerous books, and co-founder of The People’s Pharmacy website. Terry taught in the Duke University School of Nursing and was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. She is a Fellow of the Society of Applied Anthropology. Terry is one of the country's leading authorities on the science behind folk remedies. .
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Citations
  • Byrne P et al, "Statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease." BMJ, Oct. 16, 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l5674
  • Michos ED et al, "Lipid management for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease." New England Journal of Medicine, Oct. 17, 2019. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra1806939
  • Wang K et al, "Association of statin use with risk of Gleason score‐specific prostate cancer: A hospital‐based cohort study." Cancer Medicine, Oct.8, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2500
  • Allott EH et al, "Statin use and longitudinal changes in prostate volume; results from the REduction by DUtasteride of prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial." BJU International, Sep. 3, 2019. DOI: 10.1111/bju.14905
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I have taken statins off and on for about 15 years. I have elevated cholesterol but no heart disease in the family. I quit taking them on my own after reading about the side effects and having muscle pain. I was diagnosed with a low grade prostate cancer in 2011 (Gleason score 3+3=6). We have been doing watchful waiting with a PSA every 6 months. My PSA has been averaging about 4 for the last 3 years. I take Flomax, lisinopril, synthroid, and other vitamins, minerals, turmeric, coq10, joint relief pills, etc.

After reading today’s post, I wonder if I should start taking the Simvastatin again. I see my cardiologist in a couple weeks. I am 72 and about 20 lbs overweight. I hit the gym 3 times per week, play golf 2-3 times week, do meals on wheels once a week. Any thoughts?

Talk with both your urologist and your cardiologist about this. It may be to your advantage to restart it, but you will want to do so at an appropriate dose that doesn’t make your muscles hurt.

I think that an important question about the study’s results is how statins reduce the risk of prostate cancer and reduces prostate size. If the method at work here is the supression of testosterone (as is one treatment for an enlarged prostrate), other important consideration come into play. The study’s results would be more helpful if it went to the next step of identifying the cause.

I question who was behind this study. I Remember back when statins were being worshiped as the great savior for mankind. That went so far as to have a politician suggest it should be added to the public water supply.
If it was an herbal supplement it would have been yanked off the shelves years ago for all the side effects.

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